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Low Dose Naltrexone

Low Dose Naltrexone in Winnipeg

Are you looking for low dose naltrexone (LDN) in Winnipeg?  Our compounding pharmacy regularly compounds low dose naltrexone capsules.

We compound 1.5mg, 3mg and 4.5mg capsules.

Call us today at (204) 233-3469 or email us at tache@mts.net to learn more about LDN or visit our contact us page for more contact information.

Do you have a prescription for LDN capsules?  Feel free to use our online prescription order form to submit your prescription to us.

Order Your LDN Capsules Now!

Tache Pharmacy Low Dose Naltrexone Capsules

Low Dose Naltrexone Capsules

What is naltrexone?

Naltrexone is a medication which goes by the brand name Revia.

Naltrexone is a prescription medication which is classified as an opioid antagonist.  This means that it blocks opioids from binding to their specific receptors on the surface of cells in the body.

It is normally used in the treatment of opioid overdose, opioid dependence and alcohol dependence.  Naltrexone is usually given at a dosage of 50mg daily for these indications.

What is low dose naltrexone?

To qualify as low dose naltrexone (LDN), the dosage of naltrexone must be within the range of 1 mg to 5 mg daily.

The dosage is usually given once daily.

The most commonly seen doses are 1.5mg, 3mg and 4.5mg once daily.

Ultra low dose naltrexone (ULDN) are doses of naltrexone of less than 1 microgram per day.

The term Very Low Dose Naltrexone (VLDN) is used for doses in the range of 1 mcg to 1 mg daily.

Download our Low Dose Naltrexone Patient Information Sheet.

What is LDN used for?

LDN is used for a wide range of conditions.  These conditions include:

  • Autoimmune disorders
  • Chronic pain
  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Depression
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Irritable Bowel Disease
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Parkinson’s Disease
  • Psychiatric Conditions
  • PTSD
  • Ulcerative Colitis
  • Ankylosing Spondylitis
  • Autism
  • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
  • Diabetic Neuropathy
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Hashimoto’s Disease
  • Lupus
  • Pruritis / Itching
  • Psoriasis
  • Arthritis
  • Sjogren’s
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Psoriatic Arthritis
  • Restless Leg Syndrome
  • Endometriosis
  • Migraines
  • Inflammatory Conditions
  • Epstein Barr Virus
  • Weight Loss
  • And More

To learn more about the potential uses for low dose naltrexone visit https://www.ldnscience.org/ldn/what-is-ldn-used-for

How does low dose naltrexone work?

At regular “higher” doses of 50mg daily naltrexone acts as a opioid antagonist.  At lower doses the way naltrexone works (i.e. mechanism of action, pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics) changes.

Naltrexone has several dose-dependent cellular targets which produce different effects within the body.  Therefore by using different doses of naltrexone we can produce different effects

At low doses between 1mg and 5mg, naltrexone acts as a glial modulator.  Glial cells are cells that surround neurons (nerve cells). Glial cells support neurons and also act as insulators between neurons.  There are many types of glial cells.  With regards to glial cell modulation, naltrexone does this by inhibiting Toll-like receptor 4 which ultimately leads to an anti-inflammatory effect within these cells.

At low doses naltrexone still blocks opioid receptors but this is more of a short-term block.  This short-term blockage actually leads to upregulation of the body’s own endogenous opioid signalling.  This leads to pain reduction.

The way that low dose naltrexone works is very complicated and is beyond the scope of this informational page.

To learn more about how low dose naltrexone works visit:

Order Your LDN Capsules Now!

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